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Squalane

What is squalane?

Squalane is a normal lipid component of human skin. It acts as an emollient to moisturize and keep skin soft and supple. Your body produces squalane but production of it by your bodies drops off after about the age of 30 and this puts your skin at greater risk of becoming dry easily. 

Squalane  It can come from both plant and animal sources. Originally squalane in skin care products came from shark livers! Now, however, we have botanically-based, cruelty-free squalane available for skin-care-product formulation.

Why is squalane such a great ingredient in skin care products?

In addition to being a great moisturizer, squalane also helps to reduce free radical damage to skin following UV ray exposure so it is more than ‘just’ a moisturizer.
Squalane is popular for good reason. It is lightweight, feels great on your skin, is hypoallergenic, safe for sensitive skin, has some antibacterial effectiveness and plays well with other important skin care ingredients like hyaluronic acid. It also helps to heal some common rashes like seborrheic dermatitis (dandruff), acne, psoriasis, eczema and others.

Don’t confuse it with squalane with squalene!

They are related but they are very much different. The chemical structure between the two are not greatly different but the functional consequences of the difference is huge for skin care. Squalene clogs pores and goes rancid fast. Squalane, on the other hand, is noncomedogenic (does NOT clog pores).

My popular, Daily Face Creams have always offered your skin a nice dose of squalane.

Daily Face Cream for Oily to Normal Skin

best daily face cream for oily to normal skin

Daily Face Cream for Dry to Normal Skin

best daily face cream for dry skin enriched with squalane

Both are hypoallergenic, fragrance free and rich in squalane among other great ingredients for your skin! 

Reference:
Anisha Sethi, Tejinder Kaur, SK Malhotra, and ML Gambhir, Moisturizers: The Slippery Road Indian J Dermatol. 2016 May-Jun; 61(3): 279–287.