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Exercise: Fountain of Youth and Miracle Healer? Part 2

Exercise: Fountain of Youth and Miracle Healer? Part 2

For Part 1, please click here. A recent study has shown exercising 2.5 hours a week may slow Parkinson’s progression. 3,400 patients in N. America, the Netherlands, and Israel participated in the study. Parkinson’s disease damages a person’s ability to move. Participants that exercised 150 minutes a week were able to stand up from a chair, walk, turn, and sit better than those that did not exercise or exercised less. These improvements included both folks that exercised before the study and those that were new to exercise. Even patients with severe Parkinson’s, who have very limited mobility, benefited greatly from small, 30 minute/week incremental exercise. Any type of exercise was considered helpful – meaning the bottom line is ‘just do it’. Dermatologist’s input: Parkinson’s patients have increased risk of melanoma. Use good sun protection strategies if outdoors exercise is what you love most! Work up to that 150 minutes a week!

Exercise Helps Older Hearts with Heart Disease

Cardiac rehab (aka exercise in a supervised medical setting) is important after a heart attack or other heart problem. The American Heart Association just said so! The chairman of the panel that released the statement also said:
“When treating cardiac patients in their 70s, 80s, and 90s, health-care providers often stress medications and procedures without considering the importance of getting patients back on their feet, which is exactly what cardiac rehabilitation programs are designed to do."
Even daily walking, and doing more chores can be helpful. Other endorsed ideas include resistance training, balance training, Tai Chi, and yoga. If you have heart problems, ask for a prescription to go for cardiac rehab to find out how to safely add an exercise program to the medication I see patients on. As a dermatologist, I treat the rashes that those medicines cause. I see patients on so many heart, blood pressure, and cholesterol medicines that it boggles the mind of this skin doctor. If your exercise takes you outside, click here for my sun protection advice. Many of those meds cause sun allergy! Reference: Reverence Journal of Parkinson’s Disease, news release, March 23, 2017 American Heart Association, news release March 23, 2017 and published in the journal of Circulation.