FREE Shipping on orders $199 or more

5 Ways Stress Contributes to Cancer (So Chill Out!)

5 Ways Stress Contributes to Cancer (So Chill Out!)

Stress_mainIn today's hyper-connected society, we often feel like we have to be going nearly 24/7. In a digital world surrounded by ever-present mobile devices offering portable distractions at our fingertips, it seems we've forgotten how to turn off. Many of us believe we've become more efficient at getting work done thanks to the continual access/connection provided by our phones and computers. The flip side of our so-called efficiency is that our push to go, go, go creates a world where we've trained ourselves to completely ignore our need for down time. It seems like stress comes from everywhere nowadays, doesn't it? For most of us, work generally comes with some measure of stress. Add to that the time crunch you might feel in order to get everything done and still have the perfect family. Performance pressures are everywhere. Social media has connected us but what exactly has it connected us to? You can't scroll through your Facebook feed these days without reading angry vitriol about something and the daily news isn't any better. It's no wonder that according to the results of a survey conducted by the American Psychological Association (APA), "chronic stress...is becoming a public health crisis." It is essential to understand that there is a key difference between stress and chronic stress. Stress is the body's natural physiological response to the fight-or-flight situations that occur in nature. Your heart rate rises while hormones are pumped into your system to prepare you for a coming battle. A key thing to remember is that your body was designed to calm down after that adrenaline rush. With chronic stress, we experience the effects of stress without the benefit of a calm-down period. Long-term, chronic stress creates an imbalance in your system because your body is chronically in a state of fight-or-flight. It's important to note that there is no direct evidence proving that stress causes cancer. However, the impact of chronic stress can certainly have a negative impact on your body's ability to fight cancer.  Here are 5 ways chronic stress may contribute to cancer: 1. It suppresses your immune system 2. It creates chronic sleep problems 3. It opens the door for weight gain 4. It raises blood sugar levels 5. It can lead to poor choices Stress may only be a percentage of the whole picture of what can lead to cancer but it's still an important factor to be aware of.  Dr. Lorenzo Cohen, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Behavioral Sciences, at the University of Texas, M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, explained to PsychCentral:
"I fall back on the fact that regardless of what percentage it might be, it’s a percentage we’re more in control of. We can’t control genetics but we can change how we respond to stress."
The takeaway here is that chronic stress can negitively impact your life in many ways. Instead of always being on the run take time for yourself. Disconnect. Put your phone down.  Power down your computer. Looking to de-stress?  Here are some ideas to help you get started:
  • Take your dog(s) for a long walk
  • Do yoga
  • Meditate
  • Get out in nature
  • Start a gratitude journal
  • Take up a hobby that you've always wanted to try
  • Plan a night out with your friends
  • Take advantage of the spring weather and have a picnic
Want to learn more about how to reduce the chronic stress in your life? Check out Psychology Today's advice as well as this great article from MD Anderson. We're interested in you! Tell us about a time when chronic stress affected you. How did you manage it? This email was brought to you by Dr. Bailey Skin Care, LLC, a company that specializes in skin care products.  To stop receiving these emails, you may unsubscribe below. Disclaim Medical Advice: The information in the Dr. Bailey Skin Care web site, and related links, articles, newsletters and blogs, is provided as general information for educational and advertising purposes only.  The information is the opinion of Dr. Cynthia Bailey, or other indicated authors.  Consult your physician or health care provider for any specific medical conditions or concerns you may have.  (This also applies to Dr. Bailey’s patients in her medical practice in Sebastopol - the information is not a substitute for, or an extension of, the medical care she provides her patients.)  Never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking it because of something you have read here. Use the information and products referred to in this information at your own risk.  Use of the Dr. Bailey Skin Care web site, and related links, articles, newsletters and blogs indicates your agreement with these statements and the Terms and Conditions of DrBaileySkinCare.com.  If you do not agree to all of these Terms and Conditions of use, please do not use this site.

Copyright ©2016 Dr. Bailey Skin Care, LLC – All Rights Reserved

7064 Corline Ct., Ste. C, Sebastopol, CA 95472